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    Scarlet WR-3. The Wireless Anemometer Designed for Crane Safety

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Why WR-3


Cable Free

Get rid of traditional cable-type anemometer. Avoid possible risks from machine operation. Scarlet WR-3 anemometer gives users a wireless wind monitoring solution.


Long Life

4-year battery life of wind speed sensor in all weather conditions. The sensor is designed to use in rigid environments such as dessert, ocean and mountains.


Stay Alert

Never worries about high wind. Develop a safer working environment. WR-3 Anemometer sends automatic high-volume alarms based on user settings.

Wireless Sensor

WR-3 adopts 433/868/900 MHz wireless technology to ensure better performance for barrier penetration and achieving long range transmission. The sensors start sending data when wind cups revolve. The sensor will go to sleep mode when wind cups stop revolving for more than 6 hours. Data transmit rate: every 2 seconds.

The ultra-long 400 meter transmission distance makes WR-3 a perfect gadget to help you monitor wind speed on crane and prevent from high wind risks.

wr-3 sensor bearing

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Handheld Receiver

Large LCD display shows digital wind speed, temperature and beaufort chart clearly. Anti-slip rubber on two slides helps users hold the receiver in place during work. User-friendly interface and simple button design allows you to operate the device easily with only one hand.

When the wind reaches a certain speed, an alarm will be triggered, and it will continue as long as high wind is detected. The alarm buzzer located on top of the receiver can effectively warn users at the level of 90 dB.

Long Battery Life

We use innovative low-power consumption wirless technology on WR-3. The battery power consumption is only 20-30 uA in normal condition and 35 mA peak current during data transmission. 3.6V Lithium battery with 2400 mAh capacity can run the sensor for 4 years.

4-year long battery life reduces the maintenance cost significantly. Low battery indicatior on the display monitor will show up when battery capacity is lowered than 10%.

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Easy Mounting

An optional aluminum mouting bracket designed for WR-3 wind speed sensors makes the installation on the crane easily. It works along with a bronze bolt plug to keep the sensor perpendicular in any case. Minimize the risk of misleading measurement caused by angles.







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"Climate Change is Not Hysteria – It's a Fact" Leonardo Dicaprio at UN

Leonardo DiCaprio addressed world leaders assembled for the United Nations Climate Summit early Tuesday morning, urging them to take action to address "the greatest challenge of our existence on this planet."


Take a look at DiCaprio's speech below.


Thank you, Mr Secretary General, your excellencies, ladies and gentleman, and distinguished guests. I’m honored to be here today, I stand before you not as an expert but as a concerned citizen, one of the 400,000 people who marched in the streets of New York on Sunday, and the billions of others around the world who want to solve our climate crisis.


As an actor I pretend for a living. I play fictitious characters often solving fictitious problems. I believe humankind has looked at climate change in that same way: as if it were a fiction, happening to someone else’s planet, as if pretending that climate change wasn’t real would somehow make it go away.


But I think we know better than that. Every week, we’re seeing new and undeniable climate events, evidence that accelerated climate change is here now. We know that droughts are intensifying, our oceans are warming and acidifying, with methane plumes rising up from beneath the ocean floor. We are seeing extreme weather events, increased temperatures, and the West Antarctic and Greenland ice-sheets melting at unprecedented rates, decades ahead of scientific projections.


None of this is rhetoric, and none of it is hysteria. It is fact. The scientific community knows it, Industry and governments know it, even the United States military knows it. The chief of the US navy’s Pacific command, admiral Samuel Locklear, recently said that climate change is our single greatest security threat.


My Friends, this body – perhaps more than any other gathering in human history – now faces that difficult task. You can make history ... or be vilified by it.


To be clear, this is not about just telling people to change their light bulbs or to buy a hybrid car. This disaster has grown BEYOND the choices that individuals make. This is now about our industries, and governments around the world taking decisive, large-scale action.


I am not a scientist, but I don’t need to be. Because the world’s scientific community has spoken, and they have given us our prognosis, if we do not act together, we will surely perish.


Now is our moment for action.


We need to put a pricetag on carbon emissions, and eliminate government subsidies for coal, gas, and oil companies. We need to end the free ride that industrial polluters have been given in the name of a free-market economy, they don’t deserve our tax dollars, they deserve our scrutiny. For the economy itself will die if our ecosystems collapse.


The good news is that renewable energy is not only achievable but good economic policy. New research shows that by 2050 clean, renewable energy could supply 100% of the world’s energy needs using existing technologies, and it would create millions of jobs.


This is not a partisan debate; it is a human one. Clean air and water, and a livable climate are inalienable human rights. And solving this crisis is not a question of politics. It is our moral obligation – if, admittedly, a daunting one.


We only get one planet. Humankind must become accountable on a massive scale for the wanton destruction of our collective home. Protecting our future on this planet depends on the conscious evolution of our species.


This is the most urgent of times, and the most urgent of messages.


Honoured delegates, leaders of the world, I pretend for a living. But you do not. The people made their voices heard on Sunday around the world and the momentum will not stop. And now it’s YOUR turn, the time to answer the greatest challenge of our existence on this planet ... is now.


I beg you to face it with courage. And honesty. Thank you.

 

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Weather extremes worsening - United Nations

Heat waves links to global warming 

Reuters Oslo – The world suffered unprecedented climate extremes in the decade to 2010, from heatwaves in Europe and droughts in Australia to floods in Pakistan, against a backdrop of global warming, a United Nations report said on Wednesday.


Every year of the decade except 2008 was among the 10 warmest since records began in the 1850s, with 2010 the hottest, according to the study by the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO). The number of daily heat records far outstripped lows.


It said many extremes could be explained by natural variations – freak storms and droughts have happened throughout history – but that rising emissions of man-made greenhouse gases also played a role.


"Rising concentrations of heat-trapping greenhouse gases are changing our climate, with far-reaching implications for our environment and our oceans, which are absorbing both carbon dioxide and heat," WMO Secretary-General Michel Jarraud said in a statement.


The study said damaging extremes included Hurricane Katrina in the United States in 2005, Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar in 2008, floods in Pakistan in 2010, droughts in the Amazon basin, Australia and East Africa and a retreat of Arctic sea ice.


Deaths from extreme events totalled 370 000 people, up 20% from the 1990s, the Geneva-based WMO said, though the world population also rose sharply over the period, from 5.3 billion in 1990 to 6.9 billion in 2010.


The jump in the death toll was caused mainly by a heatwave in Europe in 2003 which killed 66 000 and a heatwave in Russia in 2010 in which 55 000 people died.


However, casualties from storms and droughts fell, partly because of better preparedness for disasters.


The study said that 44% of nations recorded the highest daily maximum temperature of the past half-century in the decade 2001 to 2010 but only 11% reported a new low.


It also said that the decade "continued an extended period of accelerating global warming" with average decadal temperatures 0.21°C warmer than 1991 to 2000, which was in turn 0.14°C warmer than 1981 to 1990.

Other reports have found that the rate of temperature rises has slowed this century.


"Global mean surface temperatures have not increased strongly since 1998" despite rising greenhouse gas emissions, according to a draft report by the UN's panel of climate scientists due for release in September.


Some experts say the apparent rise from the 1990s is magnified because a volcanic eruption in the Philippines in 1991 dimmed sunlight and cut temperatures.


The WMO also said it was hard to link any individual extreme events to climate change rather than to natural variability.


However, warmer air can hold more moisture, raising risks of downpours – the study said that 2010 was the wettest year since records began. And sea levels have risen about 20cm in the past century, increasing risks of storm surges.


One 2004 study, for instance, said that climate change had at least doubled the risks of the European heatwave in 2003.


Peter Stott of the UK Met Office who led that study said scientists were now trying to see if there was a human fingerprint behind other extremes in 2012, such as Superstorm Sandy or drought in Australia.

"You can't just take a record-breaking event and say 'that's climate change'," he said.

 

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Manage risks. No high wind disasters.

Scarlet WR-3 provides an elegant approach to manage on-site risks. We believe safety can be improved with well designed instruments. If you still have questions in mind, please do not hesitate to contact us. Get a quotation today. Reduce the risk, save money.


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